Tidbits about words

November 5, 2011 by  
Filed under ABBA, BBA, BBQ, cookbooks, CSA, dip, FFF, fun, GYO, ham, Martha A Cheves, new, PA, pie, Recipes, rye, soy, Stir Laugh Repeat, tidbits, TWD, ve

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?”lollipop” is the longest word typed with your right hand.

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Tidbits about words

Cancer Fighting Foods According to Web MD Part 3

The Mighty Bean Beans are so good for you, it’s no surprise they may help fight cancer, too. ?They contain several potent phytochemicals that may protect the body’s cells against damage that can lead to cancer. In the lab these substances slowed tumor growth and prevented tumors from releasing substances that damage nearby cells. The Cabbage Family vs. Cancer Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, bok choy, and kale. These members of the cabbage family make an excellent stir fry and can really liven up a salad. But most importantly, components in these vegetables may help your body defend against cancers such as colon, breast, lung, and cervix Dark Green Leafy Vegetables Dark green leafy vegetables such as mustard greens, lettuce, kale, chicory, spinach, and chard have an abundance of fiber, folate, and carotenoids. These nutrients may help protect against cancer of the mouth, larynx, pancreas, lung, skin, and stomach. Protection From an Exotic Spice Curcumin is the main ingredient in the Indian spice turmeric and a potential cancer fighter. Lab studies show it can suppress the transformation, proliferation, and invasion of cancerous cells for a wide array of cancers. Cooking Methods Matter How you cook meat can make a difference in how big a cancer risk it poses. Frying, grilling, and broiling meats at very high temperatures causes chemicals to form that may increase cancer risk. Other cooking methods such as stewing, braising, or steaming appear to produce fewer of those chemicals. And when you do stew the meat, remember to add plenty of healthy, protective vegetables.

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Cancer Fighting Foods According to Web MD Part 3

Visit to Carrabba’s Pat 4 – Linguine Pescatore

The Linguine Pescatore is made with Carrabba’s “mother” Marinara Sauce. I call it the “mother” sauce because it’s used in many of their dishes. ? Like most dishes served at Carrabba’s, it’s made of simple ingredients such as onions, garlic, anchovies, red wine, lots of tomatoes and a few herbs.? To this, Chef Michael adds shrimp, sea scallops and mussels and serves it over linguine.? This has to be one of the best marinara sauces I’ve ever eaten.? It has the bite at the back of your mouth from the pepper.? The flavor is strong but not overpowering.? As you take a bite of the seafood, you taste both the sauce as well as the seafood you are eating.? The scallops still have their delicate sweetness on the inside with the taste of the sauce on the outside.? When this is served as a dish, it’s pure heaven!

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Visit to Carrabba’s Pat 4 – Linguine Pescatore

My Trip to Carrabba’s Italian Grill – Part 1

This past Saturday I had the pleasure to visit Carrabba’s Italian Grill in Huntersville, NC.? This was made possible through the invitation of Foodbuzz Tastemaker and the Carrabba’s Proprietor Marci Lambert, with the event featuring Carrabba’s Chef Michael Brannock. Chef Michael choose several of Carrabba’s “Signature Dishes” for his demonstration.? Fortunately for me, his choices were dishes new to me.? But the real joy came when I was able to actually watch Chef Michael prepare and cook each dish individually.? Between the Pesto and the Penne Franco, plus all of the other dishes in between, my mouth and stomach took a trip to heaven.

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My Trip to Carrabba’s Italian Grill – Part 1

Summer Chicken Parmesan

If you asked me where my keys, cell phone or sunglasses are…I may not be able to tell you. But if you asked me what we had for dinner at a friend’s house 8 years ago…then I just may be able to tell ya. Seriously…some meals are unforgettable right? Well, approximately 8 years ago, before my husband and I were married, we met up with a couple of his high school friends who were house sitting not far from where we lived at the time in Orlando. They invited us over for dinner, and I remember having a really nice evening with them. I also remember what they cooked…grilled chicken, topped with chunky tomato sauce and pasta. Something about this meal stuck with me…maybe it was the good company, or maybe it was just how good and fresh it tasted. I specifically remember our friend squeezing the canned whole tomatoes with his hands to make the sauce…you would think this would not be new to me…but apparently it’s taken me 8 years to actually make sauce this way on my own. Something about using whole tomatoes in your homemade tomato sauce…once those tomatoes get broken up, the smell of freshness is so overwhelmingly delicious. You’ve got to try it yourself. We enjoyed this meal with some Summer Vegetable Gratin and of course some good Chianti… Summer Chicken Parmesan Recipe from Aggie’s Kitchen 3-4 chicken breasts olive oil salt and pepper to taste 2 large cans whole peeled tomatoes 2-3 garlic cloves, minced bunch fresh basil leaves shredded mozzarella cheese freshly grated Parmesan cheese 1/2 pound whole wheat pasta Cook pasta according to directions on box. Season both sides chicken with olive oil, salt and fresh ground pepper to taste. Place over hot grill over medium heat. Cook for approximately 4-6 minutes on each side, depending on thickness. You can tell chicken is cooked through when juices run clear when pricked with fork or knife. Or cut through thick portion of chicken to check. After you take chicken…

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Summer Chicken Parmesan

Stir, Laugh, Repeat – Book Review by Rita Hestand

Ms. Cheves wrote not just a cookbook, but a book to cook by. You’ll find a little bit of everything in this recipe filled book, from her famous “Banana Puddin’” to her home-made “Chow-Chow”. Ms. Cheves packs plenty of cooking savy in this delightful book that has a hundred differnt little cooking tips that will have you delighted, to short little tidbits of stories that will make you remember what you are cooking. Most cookbooks are just that, a cookbook, with very little else. But I highly recommend Martha’s book. She has a way of making you feel more at home in your own kitchen. She makes her recipes not only scrumptious, but easy and practical

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Stir, Laugh, Repeat – Book Review by Rita Hestand

Cabbage – What it can do for You

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Cabbage Combats cancer Prevents constipation

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Cabbage – What it can do for You

Kimchi Chigae

March 19, 2009 by  
Filed under korean, meatless, recipe, Recipes

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I love Kimchi Chigae and would take every opportunity to make some whenever I have kimchi around. Since my I made kimchi in my previous post , it’s only natural to post a recipe in homage to the almighty kimchi! And there is nothing better than Kimchi Chigae to showcase the spicy umami flavors of this native Korean delicacy. Kimchi Chigae is basically a stew made from kimchi and you can add anything you want in it. My kimchi is the vegetarian kind with soy beans, tofu, daikon radishes, rehydrated shitake mushrooms, carrots and a zucchini for good measure :P But normally, Koreans would add cubes of pork belly, beef, and seafood for protein – with cube pork belly as a preference. So here’s how I started my Kimchi Chigae and after step 1 you can proceed to add whatever

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Making Kimchi – revisited

March 18, 2009 by  
Filed under appetizer, korean, recipe, Recipes

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I’ve been making my own kimchi since the start of this blog…

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Making Kimchi – revisited

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Uncle Jim’s Kalua Pork

February 22, 2009 by  
Filed under ABBA, family, fun, Hawaiian, Lent, pork, recipe, Recipes, rice

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My nephew recently shared a recipe with me that he and a few friends came up with. Kalua Pork. Most people think it is Kahlua (the liqueur) Pork. This is false. Kalua is a Hawaiian word meaning “to cook in an underground oven” My nephew has used this recipe for many parties and wedding receptions. After losing a coin toss, it’s named after his friend and co-creator, Jim. But to me, it will always be known as My Nephew Mike’s Favorite Pork. In his own words words, I give you his recipe! Kalua Pork Place 5 to 10 pounds (or more…depending on your guest count!) of pork butt or pork shoulder into a large, deep roasting pan…’fatty’ side up. Pour 3/4 of a can of pineapple juice over the pork. Pour 3 ounces of any type liquid smoke over the pork. Cover the entire top of the pork with a thin, but still generous, layer of sea salt. (I used Himalayan Pink Sea Salt) Cover the roasting pan with 3 layers of heavy duty aluminum foil, crimping it tight around the edges for a good seal. I use a roasting pan with a ‘lip’ on it, to ensure I can crimp the foil tight. Bake the pork for 5 hours…no more, no less….at 350 degrees. Don’t touch it….don’t check it…don’t look at it….set the timer…and forget about it! Take it out of the oven and let sit for 10 to 15 minutes, then peel back the foil and shred the pork with a large kitchen fork. It will, literally, fall right apart for you…into the remaining juices! Serve it with white rice and cabbage, if you like…Island Style! This last step is very important….please read carefully! As your guests ooooh and ahhh over the delicious smell and taste of the Kalua Pork….you tell them a ‘Big Whopper’ of a lie! Yes…that’s right…you LIE! You tell them that you and your honey (if ya got one!) went out and hunted the wild pig yesterday…risking ‘life and limb’ as it charged you! You threw the spear…spot on….and nailed that sucker right between the eyes! You then came home….gutted, skinned and cleaned the beast….after which…you went out in the back yard….dug an IMU PIT 4 feet deep into the ground….covered the pig with ti leaves…put red hot …

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Uncle Jim’s Kalua Pork